ข้ามไปที่เนื้อหาหลัก

Ending a Sentence With a Preposition


Ending a Sentence With a Preposition


One of the most frequent questions I’m asked is whether it’s acceptable to end a sentence with a preposition.

I know many of you were taught that you shouldn’t end a sentence with a preposition, but it’s a myth. In fact, I consider it one of the top ten grammar mythsbecause many people believe it’s true, but because nearly all grammarians disagree, at least in some cases (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8).

So before I lose you, let's back up. What is a preposition?

What Is a Preposition?

A preposition is a word that creates a relationship between other words.  It's been said that prepositions often deal with space and time (1), which always makes me think of Star Trek. For example, the prepositions “above,” “by,” and “over” all say something about a position in space; the prepositions “before,” “after,” and “since” all say something about time.

When Can a Sentence End with a Preposition?

Here's an example of a sentence that can end with a preposition: What did you step on? A key point is that the sentence doesn't work if you leave off the preposition. You can't say, “What did you step?” You need to say, “What did you step on?” to make a grammatical sentence.

I can hear some of you gnashing your teeth right now, while you think, “What about saying, 'On what did you step?'” But really, have you ever heard anyone talk that way? I've read long, contorted arguments from noted grammarians about why it's OK to end sentences with prepositions when the preposition isn't extraneous (1), but the driving point still seems to be, “Nobody in their right mind talks this way.” Yes, you could say, “On what did you step?” but not even grammarians think you should. It sounds pedantic.

I've read long arguments about why it's OK to end sentences with prepositions when the preposition isn't extraneous, but the driving point still seems to be “Normal people don't talk that way.”

When Can't You End a Sentence with a Preposition?

But, you can't always end sentences with prepositions. When you could leave off the preposition and it wouldn't change the meaning, you should leave it off. Here is a cell phone commercial that gets on my nerves.   

[Where you at?]

For the purposes of today’s discussion, let’s ignore the fact that they left out the verb “are” because I’ve definitely heard people ask, “Where are you at?”

The problem is that “Where are you at?” doesn't need the preposition at the end. If you say “Where are you?” it means the same thing. So the "at" is unnecessary. You should leave it off. 

Unnecessary Prepositions

The problem with unnecessary prepositions doesn't happen just at the end of sentences. People often throw extraneous prepositions into the middle of sentences, and they shouldn't (2). Instead of saying “Squiggly jumped off of the dock,” it's better to say “Squiggly jumped off the dock.” You see? You don't need to say “off of the dock”; “off the dock” says the same thing without the preposition.

Another example is “outside of” when “outside” by itself would do just fine. You should say, “He's outside the door,” not, “He's outside of the door.”

Sentences Can End with Prepositions from Phrasal Verbs

So far, my examples of prepositions at the end of sentences have all been questions. Lest you think they’re a special case, we’ll look at some sentences that aren’t questions.

English has a type of verb called a phrasal verb. These are verbs made up of multiple words, and one is always a preposition. “Cheer up,” “run over,” “log on,” and “leave off” are all examples of phrasal verbs, and often sentences that use phrasal verbs end with a preposition:

  • I wish he would cheer up.
  • You should leave it off.

Those are perfectly acceptable sentences.

Other Sentences Can End with Prepositions Too

It’s also OK to end a sentence with a preposition sometimes even when you aren’t using a phrasal verb. For example, although you could rewrite the following sentences to avoid ending them with a preposition, you don’t need to.

  • She displayed the good humor she’s known for. (Could be rewritten as “She displayed the good humor for which she’s known.”)
  • I want to know where he came from. (Could be rewritten as “I want to know from where he came.”)

Cover Letter Grammar

I said you don’t need to rewrite those sentences, but because of the prevalent myth that it’s wrong to end sentences with prepositions, there are times when you should avoid doing it even though it isn’t wrong. For example, when you’re writing a cover letter to a potential employer, don’t end a sentence with a preposition. The person reading the letter could see it as an error. I always recommend following the most conservative grammar rules in job applications. I’d rather be hired than lose out on an opportunity because my grammar was correct--but perceived as wrong.

But once you're hired and you’re in a position to have a discussion about grammar, don’t be afraid to end sentences with prepositions as long as the preposition isn’t unnecessary. Just be ready to show your boss a good style guide or this Web page and do your part to dispel one of the top ten grammar myths.

ความคิดเห็น

โพสต์ยอดนิยมจากบล็อกนี้

77 Provincial Slogans in Thailand

กรุงเทพมหานคร
กรุงเทพดุจเทพส้ราง เมืองศูนย์กลางการปกครอง วัด วัง งามเรืองรอง เมืองหลวงของประเทศไทย

จังหวัดกาญจนบุรี
• แคว้นโบราณ ด่านเจดีย์ มณีเมืองกาญจน์ สะพานข้ามแม่น้ำแคว แหล่งแร่น้ำตก
• A province of ancient community, three pagodas pass, precious stones, River Kwae Bridge, Minerals and waterfall resources.

จังหวัดจันทบุรี• น้ำตกลือเลื่อง เมืองผลไม้ พริกไทยพันธุ์ดี อัญมณีมากเหลือ เสื่อจันทบูร สมบูรณ์ธรรมชาติ สมเด็จพระเจ้าตากสินมหาราช รวมญาติกู้ชาติที่จันทบุรี
• Magnificent Waterfalls, Fruit City, Good Breeding Peppercorns Loads of Gems, Chanthabun Mat, Fertile Nature, Gathering Place of King Taksin the Great’s Liberation Army

จังหวัดฉะเชิงเทรา
• แม่น้ำบางปะกงแหล่งชีวิต พระศักดิ์สิทธิ์หลวงพ่อโสธร พระยาศรีสุนทรปราชญ์ภาษาไทย อ่างฤๅไนป่าสมบูรณ์
• The Bountiful Bang Pakong River,the Sacred Buddha Image of Luangpho Sothon, Phraya Si Sunthon the Scholar of Thai Language, and the Pristine Ang Rue Nai Forest


จังหวัดชลบุรี 
• ทะเลงาม ข้าวหลามอร่อย อ้อยหวาน จักสานดี ประเพณีวิ่งควาย
• Beautiful…

Grammar: conditionals

Conditionals คือประโยคเงื่อนไข มี 4 แบบหลักๆ คือ

1. Zero conditional         
2. First conditional
3. Second conditional    

4. Third conditional


1. Zero conditional  - เราจะใช้รูปแบบนี้ก็ต่อเมื่อเราต้องการจะพูดถึงความเป็นจริงทั่วไปที่เป็นจริงตลอดกาลไม่ว่าจะอดีต ปัจจุบัน หรืออนาคต 

โครงสร้างคือ If + present simple, present simple
ตัวอย่างเช่น

1. If you exercise every day, your health is strong. 
2. If you walk in the rain, you get wet. 
3. If you don't eat dinner, you get angry. 


2. First conditional - เราจะใช้รูปแบบนี้ก็ต่อเมื่อเราต้องการจะพูดถึงเหตุการณ์ที่จะเกิดขึ้นในอนาคตที่เป็นจริงได้ (future true situations) จากเงื่อนไขที่สามารถปฏิบัติให้เป็นจริงได้

โครงสร้างคือ If + present simple, will + infinitive 
ตัวอย่างเช่น

1. If you don't hit the books, you will get poor grades.
2. If the sky is clear, we will go out for a bite.

3. Second conditional - เราจะใช้รูปแบบนี้ก็ต่อเมื่อเราต้องการจะพูดถึงสถานการณ์ปัจจุบันหรืออนาคตที่ไม่จริง เป็นสถานการณ์สมมุติทั่วไป

โครงสร้างคือ If + past simple, would +…

Grammar: -ed & -ing Adjectives

ในภาษาอังกฤษเราจะเห็นว่าส่วนใหญ่คำคุณศัพท์นั้นอาศัยการสร้างคำโดยเติม Suffix ก็คือ -ed / -ing เข้าไปจากตัวฐานเดิมที่เป็นกริยา (verb) เช่น คำว่า Interest (กริยา) เมื่อทำเป็นรูปคุณศัพท์ก็เติม -ed หรือ -ing เข้าไป จึงกลายเป็น Interested และ Interesting 
คำคุณศัพท์ที่เติม -ed เข้าไป เลยเรียกได้ 2 แบบ คือ 
1) -ed Adjectives หรือ -ed Participles ก็ได้ เพราะมันเป็นส่วนเกี่ยวข้องกับคำกริยาเดิมเพียงแค่เติม -ed เข้าไป ทำให้กลายเป็นคำคุณศัพท์
2) ในทำนองเดียวกัน คำคุณศัพท์ที่เติม -ing เข้าไป ก็เรียกว่า -ing Adjectives หรือ -ing Participles  ก็ได้ เพราะมันเป็นส่วนเกี่ยวข้องกับคำกริยาเดิมเพียงแค่เติม -ing เข้าไป ทำให้กลายเป็นคำคุณศัพท์
ทั้งสองเหมือนกันในเรื่องของหน้าที่ คือ เป็นคำคุณศัพท์ แต่โดยความหมายต่างกันดังนี้
1. -ed Adjectives มีความหมายเป็น Passive (ประธานถูกกระทำ)   2. -ing Adjectives มีความหมายเป็น Active (ประธานกระทำสิ่งนั้น) 3. -ing /-ed participial phrases วลีที่เพิ่มเข้ามาเพื่อขยายคำนามที่อยู่ก่อนหน้า ซึ่งอยู่ในสามารถอยู่ในรูป -ing และ -ed ได้

เช่น All children playing football in the park live…